Best Birth Control: Types Effectiveness and How It Works, What Are the Best and Worst Birth Control Options?, best birth control to avoid weight gain,best birth control method, What are the best birth control pill brands?, safest birth control pill,The best birth control pill for you

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Subject :Best Birth Control: Types Effectiveness and How It Works, What Are the Best and Worst Birth Control Options?, best birth control to avoid weight gain,best birth control method, What are the best birth control pill brands?, safest birth control pill,The best birth control pill for you

The best birth control is the one that most effectively prevents pregnancy and fits with your lifestyle. Generally, a male condom plus another form of birth control is the most effective way to prevent pregnancy.

What’s “best” among birth control methods differs from person to person. What’s right for you may not be right for everyone. And your needs may change over time.

Here’s what to think about when choosing a kind of birth control:

  • How fail-proof do you need your protection plan to be?
  • How much does the cost matter?
  • How important is your privacy?
  • Do you have a regular partner whose needs you care about?
  • Do you need to protect against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)?
  • How much effort do you want to make to prevent a pregnancy?
  • If you’re a woman, does it matter if your period is affected?
  • Will you someday want to have a child?

How Birth Control Works

You can compare facts about birth control methods in the sections below, including the basic ways they work. The types of methods are:

  • Behavior. This is something you and your partner decide to do to avoid pregnancy. For example, you could bar sexual intercourse altogether (abstinence), or avoid it at points in a woman’s cycle when she is likely to get pregnant (fertility awareness), or remove the penis from the vagina before ejaculation (withdrawal).
  • Barrier. This type goes on or in your body before you have sex to block sperm from getting to the egg.
  • Hormonal. This type changes a woman’s body chemistry. (Depending on the hormones, it stops ovaries from releasing eggs, thickens the mucus around your cervix to keep sperm from reaching the egg, or thins the lining of the uterus.)
  • Medical. This is a procedure that changes your body.

Birth Control Effectiveness

When doctors talk about how effective a birth control method is, there are different rates when it’s used “ideally” (exactly the way it was designed) or “typically” (by the average person in real life). “Typical” use takes into account that people can’t or don’t always use birth control correctly or consistently.

Keep in mind that out of every 100 women who don’t use any birth control, about 85 will get pregnant within a year.

Birth Control Methods

The various kinds of birth control, from most effective to least effective, are:

Abstinence

Type: Behavior

How it works: Some people consider abstinence to mean zero sexual contact (complete abstinence). Others say it’s when the penis does not have contact with the vagina (contraceptive abstinence).

Number of pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 0
  • Typical use = unknown

How long it lasts: As long as you abstain

STD protection? Yes, when you practice complete abstinence; no, if you practice only contraceptive abstinence.

Need to see a doctor? No

Pros: Highly effective when used correctly. No side effects. No cost.

Cons: Giving up sex for a long time may be very hard. You might also have trouble saying “no” or “stop” while you’re enjoying other sex play.

Sterilization surgery for women

Type: Medical

How it works: A doctor blocks, ties, clamps, seals, or cuts the two fallopian tubes that connect a woman’s ovaries and uterus. It’s also known as a tubal ligation or “getting your tubes tied.”

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = less than 1

How long it lasts: Permanent

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: It’s a one-time procedure.

Cons: You’ll have to go to the hospital, and you’ll need general anesthesia for the surgery. Risks of pain, bleeding, infection, and ectopic pregnancy afterward. Not meant to be reversed.

Sterilization surgery for men

Type: Medical

How it works: The tubes from the testes to other glands are blocked so the semen no longer has sperm.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = less than 1

How long it lasts: Ongoing

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: One-time procedure. Needs only local anesthesia.

Cons: Risks of pain, bleeding, and infection. Waiting period before it’s effective. Not meant to be reversed.

Birth control implant

Type: Hormonal

How it works: Using a needle, a doctor puts a matchstick-sized rod with progestin under the skin on your arm.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = less than 1

How long it lasts: Up to 3 years

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: Long-term protection against pregnancy. Can be reversed easily if you want to get pregnant.

Cons: May cause weight gain and changes in your bleeding pattern. Possible breast and stomach pain.

Progestin IUD (Kyleena, Liletta, Mirena, Skyla)

Type: Hormonal

How it works: A small T-shaped device that has progestin goes into your uterus.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = less than 1

How long it lasts: Up to 3-5 years

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: There’s nothing to do right before having sex. Once it’s removed, you can get pregnant. Can be used while breastfeeding. May cause lighter periods or no periods.

Cons: May cause irregular periods, pain, or ovarian cysts. In some unusual cases, can make pelvic infections worse. Rarely, the IUD may get stuck in or on your uterus or cause a serious infection.

Copper IUD

Type: Medical

How it works: A small T-shaped device with copper goes into your uterus. It keeps sperm from reaching or fertilizing the egg. It may keep the egg from attaching to the lining of your uterus.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = less than 1

How long it lasts: Up to 10 years

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: There’s nothing to do right before having sex. Once removed, it’s possible to conceive. Can be used while breastfeeding.

Cons: May cause cramps or bleeding. In some unusual cases, can make pelvic infections worse. Rarely, the IUD could get stuck in or on your uterus or cause a serious infection.

Birth control shot (Depo-Provera)

Type: Hormonal

How it works: Your doctor gives you a shot of progestin.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = 6

How long it lasts: 3 months

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: There’s nothing to do right before having sex. Birth control protection starts with the first shot. Reversible. Can use while breastfeeding.

Cons: Must get repeat injections on time. You may lose bone density when you get shots for more than 2 years in a row. May cause bleeding between periods, headaches, weight gain, nervousness, or belly discomfort. You may not ovulate for up to a year after a shot.

Vaginal ring (NuvaRing)

Type: Hormonal

How it works: You put a flexible plastic ring into your vagina. It releases progestin and estrogen.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = 9

How long it lasts: 1 month for each ring

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: Easy to use. Nothing to do right before having sex.

Cons: Must keep the ring in place, and change it on schedule. May cause vaginal discharge and mild discomfort. Higher risks of heart attack and stroke. Can come out of place.

Vaginal Gel (Phexxi)

Type: Non-Hormonal

How it works: You insert the gel into your vagina via applicator immediately before or up to one hour before sex.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 10
  • Typical use = 16

How long it lasts: One act of intercourse

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? yes

Hormones? No

Pros: Easy to insert. Lubricates vagina.

Cons: Must be put inside the vagina immediately before or up to one hour  sex. If you have sex more than once within the hour, you must use another applicator. May cause irritation, allergic reactions, and infections.

Birth control patch

Type: Hormonal

How it works: You stick a square patch that’s about 2 inches across on your abdomen, buttocks, arm, or back. Your skin absorbs estrogen and progestin from it. Use it for 3 weeks, and then skip a week so you have a period.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = 9

How long it lasts: 1 week per patch

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: Easy to use. Nothing to do right before sex.

Cons: Must be changed on time. It May cause a skin reaction. Raises risks of blood clots and strokes.

Extended- or continuous-use birth control pill

Type: Hormonal

How it works: You take a pill with progestin and estrogen every day.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = 9

How long it lasts: 3 months or 1 year, depending on your prescription

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: Nothing to do right before sex. Fewer or no periods. Makes menstrual cramps and acne less severe.

Cons: Must take a pill at the same time every day. May cause more spotting between periods than with regular birth control pills. Fewer or no periods make it harder to know if you’re pregnant. May cause changes in your period, nausea, breast tenderness, headache, high blood pressure risks, and higher chances of blood clots, heart attacks, and stroke.

Birth control pill

Type: Hormonal

How it works: You take a pill with progestin and estrogen every day.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = 9

How long it lasts: 1 month per package

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: Nothing to do right before sex. Makes periods more regular and lighter. Makes menstrual cramps and acne less severe.

Cons: Must take a pill at the same time every day. May cause changes in your period, nausea, breast tenderness, or headache. You may have high blood pressure. Brings higher risks of blood clots, heart attacks, and stroke.

Birth control “mini-pill”

Type: Hormonal

How it works: You take a pill with progestin every day.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = less than 1
  • Typical use = 9

How long it lasts: 1 month per package

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: Nothing to do right before sex. Can be used while breastfeeding. Makes periods lighter. Makes menstrual cramps less severe. May be used if you can’t take the regular birth control pill because of high blood pressure, blood clots, migraines, and smoking over age 35.

Cons: Must take a pill at the same time every day. Can cause irregular bleeding, headache, breast tenderness, nausea, and dizziness.

Diaphragm with spermicide

Type: Barrier

How it works: You load a dome-shaped disk with sperm-killing jelly (nonoxynol-9) and put it into your vagina to cover your cervix.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 6
  • Typical use = 12

How long it lasts: Up to 2 hours

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: Works immediately. Neither you nor your partner can feel it. Can be used while breastfeeding. No hormonal changes. Can be inserted hours before having sex. Can be left inside the vagina for up to 24 hours, as long as you add spermicide each time you have sex and then every 2 hours afterward.

Cons: Must be fitted to your size and refitted often. Can cause irritation, allergic reactions, or infections. Spermicides with nonoxynol-9 can increase risks of HIV. Must leave diaphragm in for at least 6 hours after sex. More than 24 hours of use raises risks of toxic shock syndrome.

Male condom

Type: Barrier

How it works: You put a thin sheath over your erect penis right before sex and take it off before the penis gets soft.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 2
  • Typical use = 18

How long it lasts: One act of intercourse

STD protection? Yes

Need to see a doctor? No

Pros: Widely available, easy to carry, and disposable. Latex condoms are the best protection against STDs other than abstinence.

Cons: Must be used every time you have sex. Makes sex less spontaneous, since you need to put the condom on the right way. May cause irritation or allergic reactions.

Female condom

Type: Barrier

How it works: You put a thin pouch into your vagina before sex.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 5
  • Typical use = 21

How long it lasts: One act of intercourse

STD protection? Yes

Need to see a doctor? No

Pros: Can be inserted before sex. Less decrease in sensation for men than with a male condom. Stronger than latex.

Cons: Can slip while using. May be hard to insert or remove. Not easy to find. Costs more than male condoms.

Withdrawal

Type: Behavior

How it works: Men take their penis out of the vagina before they ejaculate.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 4
  • Typical use = 22

How long it lasts: One act of intercourse

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? No

Pros: Free. Can be used with other forms of birth control.

Cons: The man may not pull out in time. Pre-ejaculate can still contain sperm.

Fertility awareness

Type: Behavior

How it works: Women track their fertility to figure out which days to abstain from sex or use a barrier method.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = up to 5
  • Typical use = 24

How long it lasts: As long as it’s practiced

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? No

Pros: May be OK for some religious practices. Inexpensive. Helps you understand your body better.

Cons: Requires careful record-keeping. You can’t be sexually spontaneous during fertile periods. Not useful if your menstrual cycle lasts fewer than 26 or more than 32 days.

Sponge with spermicide

Type: Barrier

How it works: You put a disk with sperm-killing jelly (nonoxynol-9) into the vagina before having sex.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 9-12 (Pregnancy is more likely if you’ve already had a baby.)
  • Typical use = 20-24

How long it lasts: Up to 24 hours

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? No

Pros: Works right away. Can have sex more than once while inserted, with no need to add more spermicide.

Cons: May not fit well for women who’ve had a baby. Can cause irritation or allergic reactions or be difficult to remove from vagina. Spermicides with nonoxynol-9 can increase risks of HIV. Must leave sponge in for at least 6 hours after sex. More than 24 to 30 hours of use raises risk of toxic shock syndrome.

Cervical cap with spermicide

Type: Barrier

How it works: You put a soft cup loaded with sperm-killing jelly (nonoxynol-9) inside your vagina to fit snugly over your cervix.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 14
  • Typical use = 17-23

How long it lasts: Up to 42 hours

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Hormones? No

Pros: Smaller and uses less spermicide than a diaphragm. Reusable. Can be put in up to 6 hours before sex. Can have sex more than once while it’s in, with no need to add more spermicide.

Cons: May not fit well for women who’ve had a baby. May need to be resized. May cause irritation, allergic reactions, or unusual Pap smears. Spermicides with nonoxynol-9 can increase risks of HIV. Must be left in for at least 6 hours after sex. More than 48 hours of use raises risks of toxic shock syndrome.

Spermicide

Type: Barrier

How it works: Women put a foam, cream, jelly, film, or tablet containing sperm-killing nonoxynol-9 into their vagina.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 18
  • Typical use = 28

How long it lasts: One act of intercourse

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? No

Hormones? No

Pros: Easy to insert. Lubricates vagina.

Cons: Must be put in 5 to 90 minutes before sex and left inside for at least 6 to 8 hours after. May cause irritation, allergic reactions, and infections. Can increase risks of HIV.

Vaginal Gel (Phexxi)

Type: Non-Hormonal

How it works: You insert the gel into your vagina via applicator immediately before or up to 1 hour before sex.

Pregnancies per 100 women:

  • Ideal use = 10
  • Typical use = 16

How long it lasts: One act of intercourse

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? yes

Hormones? No

Pros: Easy to insert. Lubricates vagina.

Cons: Must be put inside the vagina 15-60 minutes before sex. If you have sex more than once within the hour, you must use another applicator. May cause irritation, allergic reactions, and infections.

Morning-after pill (Next Choice, Plan B, Plan B One-Step)

Type: Emergency hormonal

How it works: Stops an egg from leaving the ovary. May also prevent an egg from getting fertilized or attaching to the uterus lining.

Effectiveness: Prevents pregnancy in 7 out of 8 women who would have otherwise gotten pregnant.

When it works: Up to 3 days after having unprotected sex or birth control failure

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? No, if you’re 18 or older; maybe, if you’re not

Pros: You can buy Plan B One-Step without a prescription. Next Choice and Plan B are available over-the-counter if you’re 17 or older.

Cons: Not meant for regular birth control. If you’re under 17, you may need a prescription. May cause nausea, vomiting, belly pain, fatigue, and headache.

Ella (ulipristal acetate)

Type: Emergency hormonal

How it works: Blocks a hormone to stop or delay the ovaries from releasing an egg. May also prevent the egg from attaching to the uterus lining.

Effectiveness: Prevents pregnancy in 6 or 7 out of every 10 women who would have otherwise gotten pregnant.

When it works: Within 5 days of having unprotected sex or birth control failure

STD protection? No

Need to see a doctor? Yes

Pros: Can be taken later than other forms of emergency contraception. May be more effective than other emergency contraception if you’re overweight.

Cons: Not meant for regular birth control. Requires a prescription. May cause headache, nausea, belly pain, menstrual cramps, fatigue, or dizziness. Use only birth control methods without hormones for the next 5 days.

Plenty of people have sex with no intention of having a baby, and there are more options than ever to prevent a pregnancy. 

According to CeCe Cheng, MD, a maternal-fetal medicine physician in Texas and a fellow with Physicians for Reproductive Health, preventing pregnancy may not be the only or most important goal of birth control, either. 

Contraception Is Not Just About Preventing Pregnancy

“Before jumping into efficacy, when we talk to patients about contraceptives, we first narrow down what they want out of it,” she says. In women, birth control can also help lighten heavy periods, regulate menstrual cycles, and clear up acne, according to the Office on Women’s Health. 

That’s not to say that birth control should only be a concern for women. According to Meera Shah, MD, MPH, birth control is every partner’s responsibility. 

“Everyone should be counseled on all methods of contraception,” she says, from birth control pills to vasectomies, regardless of their gender.

What Type of Contraception Is Right for You  Right Now?

The form of birth control that’s right for each person is very personal, and may change down the line. According to Dr. Shah, you are never locked into one form of reversible birth control and can always switch to another. It’s your healthcare provider’s job to help you navigate each one and advise on how it might apply to your lifestyle, goals, and needs. 

“It’s about finding the best method for the patient, not a doctor pushing an agenda of what they think is the best one,” she says. “If you need to change, even after a month, don’t feel bad about it. Sometimes it takes a few attempts to find something that folks are comfortable with.”

Here’s a quick and easy guide to birth control options, including the pros and cons of each.

Barrier Methods

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There are two types of barrier methods: condoms and diaphragms. 

Condoms are the only method of birth control that have the added protection of preventing sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and the traditional type, used on a penis, is not your only option.

“Condoms are an incredible method of contraception, it’s just that they aren’t always used,” says Shah, noting that if you don’t use one every time, it’s a good idea to have another method, like emergency contraception, on hand. 

Most condoms are made of latex, a type of rubber. It’s important to always use a water-based lubricant — instead of an oil-based lube — with latex condoms because oil-based products can damage the material and make it less effective, according to Planned Parenthood.

If one or more partners has a latex allergy, you can find condoms made of non-latex plastic and lambskin. But keep in mind that lambskin condoms do not protect against STIs.

Classic condoms are designed to cover a penis and catch semen, as well as protect partners’ genitals from coming into direct contact. 

Pros: Latex and plastic condoms protect against STIs and are easily accessible in stores and often free at clinics. 

Cons: They’re only about 85 percent effective at preventing pregnancy, in part because they can break. 

Internal Condoms

You may have heard these colloquially called “female condoms.” Internal condoms sit inside the vagina and work the same way condoms worn over a penis do: They prevent sperm from coming into contact with an egg. 

Pros: Made of soft plastic, they prevent STIs and pregnancy. 

Cons: They’re only 79 percent effective at preventing pregnancy. 

Diaphragms and Cervical Caps

A diaphragm is essentially a shallow, bendable cup that sits in your cervix, kind of like a menstrual cup. Diaphragms aren’t condoms, so they don’t prevent STIs, but when used correctly, they do prevent sperm from reaching an egg. Cervical caps work in a similar fashion.

Pros: At 88 percent, diaphragms are more effective than condoms. 

Cons: According to Planned Parenthood, for the greatest protection, diaphragms should be used with a spermicide — more on this below.

Intrauterine Devices (IUDs)

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An IUD is a small, flexible, T-shaped plastic device that’s placed at the bottom of the uterus. It’s known for its ease of use and efficacy as long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). There are two general types: a copper IUD and a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG IUD), and five brands have been approved by the FDA. Some IUDs can stop you from getting a regular period. 

According to Planned Parenthood, three brands of IUD — Paragard, Mirena, and Liletta — can also be used for emergency contraception if inserted within five days of unprotected sex. 

Copper IUD

Paragard is a hormone-less IUD that’s wrapped in copper, and it produces an inflammatory reaction that’s toxic to both sperm and eggs, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can be effective for 10 to 12 years but can be removed at any time. 

Pros: It’s more than 99 percent effective, long-lasting, and doesn’t require regular maintenance. 

Cons: It may not be an option if you have uterine abnormalities like fibroids, and requires an appointment with your healthcare provider to get it out. It can increase cramping, heaviness of flow, and the number of menstruation days.

Hormonal Intrauterine Device (IUD)

Levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG IUD)

LNG IUDs (Mirena, Kyleena, Liletta, and Skyla) release a small amount of progestin daily and last three to seven years, depending on the brand, though you can have it removed sooner. 

Pros: It’s more than 99 percent effective, lasts years, and doesn’t require regular clinic visits or prescription refills. 

Cons: Having a device inside the body isn’t for everyone, and it’s a bit more involved to remove than, say, stopping the pill or taking out a ring. It may not be an option for those with uterine abnormalities.

Hormonal Contraceptives

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Hormonal contraceptives use two hormones, estrogen, and progestin, to keep ovaries from ovulating (releasing an egg), according to the Mayo Clinic. The hormones also thicken the cervical lining, notes Planned Parenthood, which blocks sperm from swimming up the cervix. 

“For certain people, the estrogen in some hormonal contraceptives can increase the risk of blood clots, high blood pressure, and stroke when combined with other risk factors like smoking or being above age 35,” says Dr. Cheng. 

Birth Control Pill

There are tons of different options when it comes to the pill, but they all fall into two categories: combination pills, which contain both estrogen and progestin, and progestin-only pills. According to Planned Parenthood, combination pills are the most common, but you and your healthcare provider can determine which version is right for you. It’s also worth noting that although you have to take any type of birth control pill daily, some have to be taken at the exact same time every single day to be effective, says Shah. 

Pros: The pill can regulate your menstrual cycle, reduce cramps, and even clear up acne. It’s about 91 percent effective when used correctly.

Cons: It offers no STI protection, and you have to commit to taking it around the same time every day.

Birth Control Patches

There are two birth control patches approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA): Xulane and Twirla. Like the pill, patches contain hormones that keep you from ovulating, but in this case, you don’t have to remember to take a pill every day. Patches are worn on the arm, belly, or buttocks, and release hormones into your skin. 

You wear three different patches throughout one menstrual cycle, swapping out the old one for a fresh patch every week, and then have a period during the fourth week. 

Pros: It’s 99 percent effective and can help regulate your cycle.

Cons: It does not prevent STIs, and you have to remember to fill your prescription every month.

Birth Control Rings

There are two brands approved by the FDA: NuvaRing and Annovera, which last slightly different amounts of time before needing to be replaced. Both are small, flexible rings that sit inside your vagina and continually release hormones until you take them out the week of your period. Importantly, you don’t take a ring out during sex. 

Pros: It’s 91 percent effective and can be more convenient than the pill, with the same effect on your cycle. 

Cons: Products that contain silicone or oil can damage the Annovera ring, and neither product protects against STIs. 

Birth Control Shots

The Depo-Provera shot, often called “Depo” for short, is an injection of progestin given once every three months.

Pros: It’s 96 percent effective, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and it might be more convenient for some people than a pill or device. It’s progestin-only, which may make it safer for some people. If you don’t want others to know you’re using contraception, the shot is “invisible.”

Cons: It requires a healthcare center visit four times a year to get the shot, and it doesn’t prevent STIs. 

Birth Control Implants

An implant is a thin rod that’s inserted under the skin of your upper arm and releases progestin over the course of three to five years, protecting you from pregnancy. If you’d like it out sooner, that’s always an option. Like IUDs, implants are long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), known for ease of use and efficacy. 

Pros: It’s 99.9 percent effective at preventing pregnancy. Because it’s progestin-only, it may be safer for some people, and it lasts for three to five years. 

Con: Not everyone wants a device implanted in their body, and it doesn’t prevent STIs.

You Can Email Us Questions & Comments: info@healthcitylife.com

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